What defines the trigone of the urinary bladder

Urinary Bladder Development

what defines the trigone of the urinary bladder

Internal Structure & Microscopic Anatomy of the Urinary Bladder

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The Urinary System is a group of organs in the body concerned with filtering out excess fluid and other substances from the bloodstream. The substances are filtered out from the body in the form of urine. Urine is a liquid produced by the kidneys, collected in the bladder and excreted through the urethra. Urine is used to extract excess minerals or vitamins as well as blood corpuscles from the body. The Urinary organs include the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra. The Urinary system works with the other systems of the body to help maintain homeostasis.

The urinary system's function is to filter blood and create urine as a waste by-product. The organs of the urinary system include the kidneys, renal pelvis, ureters, bladder and urethra. The body takes nutrients from food and converts them to energy. After the body has taken the food components that it needs, waste products are left behind in the bowel and in the blood. Urea is produced when foods containing protein, such as meat, poultry, and certain vegetables, are broken down in the body. Urea is carried in the bloodstream to the kidneys, where it is removed along with water and other wastes in the form of urine. Other important functions of the kidneys include blood pressure regulation and the production of erythropoietin, which controls red blood cell production in the bone marrow.

The urinary bladder more commonly just called the bladder is a distal part of the urinary tract and is an extraperitoneal structure located in the true pelvis. Its primary function is as a reservoir for urine. The bladder has a triangular shape with a posterior base, an anterior apex and an inferior neck with two inferolateral surfaces. It is lined with a rough, trabeculated transitional cell epithelium except at the trigone. The trigone is a triangular area of smooth mucosa found on the internal surface of the base. The superolateral angles are formed by the ureteric orifices and the inferior angle is formed by the internal urethral orifice.

Urinary tract : The transport and removal of urine from the body follows the urinary tract. The organs, tubes, muscles, and nerves that work together to create, store, and carry urine are referred to as the urinary system, which is another name for the renal system. The renal system filters the plasma of blood and regulates blood volume by excreting excess water in the form of urine. Urine transport follows a path through the kidneys, ureters, bladder, and urethra, which are collectively known as the urinary tract. Urine is essentially water, ions, and secreted molecules that leave the collecting duct of the many nephrons of the kidney and flow into the ureters. The ureters are two tubes that drain urine from the kidneys to the bladder.

The trigone a. The area is very sensitive to expansion and once stretched to a certain degree, the urinary bladder signals the brain of its need to empty. The signals become stronger as the bladder continues to fill. Embryologically, the trigone of the bladder is derived from the caudal end of mesonephric ducts , which is of mesodermal origin the rest of the bladder is endodermal. In the female the mesonephric ducts regress, causing the trigone to be less prominent, but still present.



Human Physiology/The Urinary System

The urinary bladder is a temporary storage reservoir for urine., About Translations. The paired adult kidneys filter blood, reabsorb water, have endocrine functions and excrete waste.

Anatomy of the Urinary System

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The urinary tract is an outflow system that conducts urine from the kidneys to the bladder via the ureters that propel urine to the bladder via peristalsis. Once in the bladder, the ureteral valve, a mechanism that is not well understood, prevents backflow of urine to the kidney that can cause severe damage and induce end-stage renal disease. The upper and lower urinary tract compartments form independently, connecting at mid-gestation when the ureters move from their primary insertion site in the Wolffian ducts to the trigone, a muscular structure comprising the bladder floor just above the urethra. Precise connections between the ureters and the trigone are crucial for proper function of the ureteral valve mechanism; however, the developmental events underlying these connections and trigone formation are not well understood. According to established models, the trigone develops independently of the bladder, from the ureters, Wolffian ducts or a combination of both; however, these models have not been tested experimentally. Using the Cre-lox recombination system in lineage studies in mice, we find, unexpectedly, that the trigone is formed mostly from bladder smooth muscle with a more minor contribution from the ureter, and that trigone formation depends at least in part on intercalation of ureteral and bladder muscle.

The trigone (a.k.a. vesical trigone) is a smooth triangular region of the internal urinary bladder formed by the two ureteric orifices and the internal urethral orifice.
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